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Children’s Oral Health: Diet Regulations

pediatric dentist Franklin Lakes

Children’s Oral Health: Diet Regulations

It is common knowledge that food and drinks containing a high amount of sugar, such as candies and sodas, just to mention a couple, are harmful to oral health. The high intake of sugar leads to tooth decay, which, at the same time, may lead to other more serious complications. But, sugary foods and drinks are not the only harmful elements of your child’s diet. When it comes to oral health, there are other foods that may have a negative impact on your child’s teeth. In fact, some of these foods are healthy, but when interacting with your child’s teeth, they may not be so.  [Related: pediatric dentist Franklin Lakes]


RELATED: Pediatric Dentist Associates in Ridgewood has been assisting children on their oral health care for several years. For an appointment or more information on their pediatric dentist Franklin Lakes, pediatric dentist Elmwood Park and pediatric dentist Midland Park services, call them now at (201) 652-7020.

The reason why sugar and starch are not beneficial for oral health is because once ingested, they are turned into acid by bacteria in the mouth. The interaction of this acid with saliva, other bacteria and food residues result in the formation of plaque, which leads to tooth decay. Because of this, foods as bananas, tomatoes, breads, chips, citrusy fruits and drinks, among others, become more easily into acid and, consequently, may have a harmful effect on the teeth. It does not mean that your child must avoid these foods but rather limit their consumption.

On the other hand, there are some other foods that will help your child maintain a good oral health and counteract any negative effects caused by the foods mentioned above. Foods rich in calcium and phosphorus such as meat, nuts, cheese and milk, help rebuild the enamel, which is a highly mineralized substance that protects your child’s teeth.  Additionally, vegetables and firm fruits, such as pears and apples, also help to fight the harmful effects of sugar on the teeth because of their high water content.

Although some the foods mention above may have a negative effect in your child’s oral health, it does not mean that they must be completely avoided. Instead, there must be a balance between the “good” foods and the “not so good” ones. In this way, your child will be able to enjoy their favorite foods without you having to worry about how damaged their teeth will be.

 

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